Abstract :

Objective: We aimed to evaluate the factors that may affect overall survival by examining the complaints, demographic and clinical features of patients who underwent radical orchiectomy with a pre-diagnosis of testicular mass.

Material and Methods: Between January 2010 and June 2018,demographic,clinical, patho- logical data and oncologic outcomes of 113 pa- tients who underwent radical orchiectomy with a diagnosis of testicular mass were evaluated retrospectively.Reasons for admission to the doc- tor,the history of testicular cancer in himself and his relatives,the factors that led him to refer to the doctor, the rates of regular testicular self-examina- tion during the pre-treatment and post-treatment period were recorded.

Results: In 113 patients with a median age of 29 (ranged 17-60),the most common complaints were painless mass (%52.4), swelling (%10.6), history of testicular cancer in himself (%6.2) and his relatives (%7.1), his wife’s warning (%6.2).The patients having general knowledge about testic- ular cancer, university graduates, married indi- viduals, patients with history of testicular cancer in himself and his relatives, performing regular testicular self-examination had the higher rates of early stage testicular germ cell tumor or benign pathology.History of testicular cancer in himself and his relatives,history of undescended testi- cle,low educational level,not to be married,no pri- or knowledge of testicular cancer,not performing regular testicular self-examination before diagnosis and during the follow-up period,advanced tumor stage, disrupt follow-up after treatment were found to be independent risk factors for decreased overall survival.

Conclusion: We think that the history of testicular cancer, high- er education level and spouse awareness may increase the likelihood of testicular masses’ being detected earlier.In this way, less toxic treatments can be administered since the increased tumor rates de- tected in the early stage, and also better oncologic outcomes can be achieved.

<p style=Objective: We aimed to evaluate the factors that may affect overall survival by examining the complaints, demographic and clinical features of patients who underwent radical orchiectomy with a pre-diagnosis of testicular mass.

Material and Methods: Between January 2010 and June 2018,demographic,clinical, patho- logical data and oncologic outcomes of 113 pa- tients who underwent radical orchiectomy with a diagnosis of testicular mass were evaluated retrospectively.Reasons for admission to the doc- tor,the history of testicular cancer in himself and his relatives,the factors that led him to refer to the doctor, the rates of regular testicular self-examina- tion during the pre-treatment and post-treatment period were recorded.

Results: In 113 patients with a median age of 29 (ranged 17-60),the most common complaints were painless mass (%52.4), swelling (%10.6), history of testicular cancer in himself (%6.2) and his relatives (%7.1), his wife’s warning (%6.2).The patients having general knowledge about testic- ular cancer, university graduates, married indi- viduals, patients with history of testicular cancer in himself and his relatives, performing regular testicular self-examination had the higher rates of early stage testicular germ cell tumor or benign pathology.History of testicular cancer in himself and his relatives,history of undescended testi- cle,low educational level,not to be married,no pri- or knowledge of testicular cancer,not performing regular testicular self-examination before diagnosis and during the follow-up period,advanced tumor stage, disrupt follow-up after treatment were found to be independent risk factors for decreased overall survival.

Conclusion: We think that the history of testicular cancer, high- er education level and spouse awareness may increase the likelihood of testicular masses’ being detected earlier.In this way, less toxic treatments can be administered since the increased tumor rates de- tected in the early stage, and also better oncologic outcomes can be achieved.

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